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Midland Living Magazine

Skills for Life FCCLA

provided by | texas association family, career and community leaders of america


MISSION
To promote personal growth and leadership development through Family and Consumer Sciences education. Focusing on the multiple roles of family member, wage earner, and community leader, members develop skills for life through character development, creative and critical thinking, interpersonal communication, practical knowledge, and career preparation.


PURPOSE
1   To provide opportunities for personal development and preparation for adult life.
2   To strengthen the function of the family as a basic unit of society.
3   To encourage democracy through cooperative action in the home and community.
4   To encourage individual and group involvement in helping achieve global cooperation and harmony.
5   To promote greater understanding between youth and adults.
6   To provide opportunities for making decisions and for assuming responsibilities.
7   To prepare for the multiple roles of men and women in today’s society.
8   To promote Family and Consumer Sciences and related occupations.



CREED
We are the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America. We face the future with warm courage and high hope. For we have the clear consciousness of seeking old and precious values. For we are the builders of homes, homes for America’s future, homes where living will be the expression of everything that is good and fair, homes where truth and love and security and faith will be realities, not dreams. We are the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America. We face the future with warm courage and high hope.



 







HOW FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA BEGAN...


1917
Smith Hughes Act passed; National Vocational Act was signed by Woodrow Wilson providing funding for homemaking and all vocational programs.


1919
First State Girls Clothing Contest in Austin.


1930
First State Meeting of Home Economics Club was held in Houston, TX.


1933
The name Future Homemakers of Texas Rally was first used at a state meeting of home economics clubs in San Antonio.


1936
-  Future Homemakers of Texas adopted/ approved in San Angelo
-  FHT: “Our Dreams of Today Are the Realizations of Tomorrow”
-  Colors were Silver and  Blue; flower was  the cornflower
-  1,515 members attended the Future Homemakers of Texas Rally 
    in Galveston, TX
-  Texas had 450 chapters, 46,000 members


1938
The name Future Homemakers of Texas Rally was first used at a state meeting of home economics clubs in San Antonio




1943-47 
No state meetings took place because of transportation and housing issues during World War II.



 

 

1945
- June 11, 1945- Future Homemakers of America (FHA) founded with colors red and white; 
flower: red rose
- New Homemakers of America (NHA) was founded for African American students in 16 states where schools were segregated by law
- Texas affiliated with National Future Homemakers
 of America on December 7, 1945
- Texas was the fifth state to receive charter


1946
First FHA sub-region meetings took place all over United States; one in Nacogdoches, TX



 

1948
National meeting was held in Kansas City, MO with 2,000 attendees. First Texas State Degree Award was awarded to Gene Marr in Galveston, TX


1964
National dues increased from $0.15 to $0.25
Cost of gas: $0.29 per gallon.


 

1965
FHA and New Homemakers of America
merged creating one organization.

1966
National membership peaked at 607,175 members;
Texas had 73,820 members with 1,542 chapters.


1968
The Texas state scholarship program began.




 

1970
- CJ Davidson Scholarship begins with a $300 
  award, every other year, after Mr. Davidson 
  reads Barbara Baley’s article in Ft. Worth 
  newspaper Today, the CJ Davidson 
  Scholarship awards ten $18,000 scholarships 
  each year
- Occupational Home Economics became part 
   of Home Economics


1971
- CJ Davidson Scholarship begins with a $300 
  award, every other year, after Mr. Davidson 
  reads Barbara Baley’s article in Ft. Worth 
  newspaper Today, the CJ Davidson 
  Scholarship awards ten $18,000 scholarships 
  each year
- Occupational Home Economics became part 
   of Home Economics


1973
The first male national officer, Tony Bingham,
was elected in Washington D.C.

1977
The emblem was changed to be an eight sided emblem with FHA and HERO situated in the center; the rays extending to the edge represented FHA/HERO’s
outreach to the community. 


 

1979

Japanese Exchange Program and the Student Body programs were introduced.
Carl Lockhart was elected the first male area president in Texas.
National dues increased from $1.00 to $2.00
Cost of gas: $0.86 per gallon.




 

1980
Texas State FHA Choir was discontinued.

1981
- Official ground-breaking ceremony for
  national headquarters in Reston, VA

- Monya Frazier was elected the first African  
  American National President


1982
Red blazer was adopted by voting delegates as the
official officer uniform on the national level.


1983
- Texas hosted the first National Cluster 
   Meeting in Dallas, TX
- STAR Events began with 8 events 
   offered National dues increased from 
   $2.00 to $4.00
- Cost of gas: $1.16 per gallon


1987
- Texas combined all 10 areas in FHA 
   to create 5 regions and made 
   adjustments to all officer elections
   and programming
- Financial Fitness program was 
   introduced


 

1988
George Strait created an album
“George Strait’s Favorites for FHA”
as a fundraiser for Texas FHA


1986
- Tom Lucas (WV) was elected the first 
  male National President
- Power of One and Community Service 
  programs introduced
- The ten Texas Area Offices were 
  closed; all Texas Education Agency 
  staff serving FHA moved to Austin




 

1990
Texas hosted the National Leadership Conference in San Antonio, TX.

1993
National Dues increased from $4.00 to $5.00.

1994
Families Acting for Community Traffic Safety
(FACTS) program was introduced.


1995
- FHA/HERO celebrated their 50th Anniversary
- The Home Economics profession changed its 
   name to Family and Consumer Sciences


 

1996
- National dues increased from $5.00 to $6.00
- Families First program was introduced


1998
Career Connection program was introduced.

1999
- FHA/HERO voting delegates 
  voted in July during the National 
  Leadership Conference in Boston, MA to change the name of  the association to Family, Career and Community Leaders of America. President Brandon Abbott (Texas)presided.
- National dues increased from $6.00 to $7.00
  Cost of gas: $1.60 per gallon



2000
STOP the Violence program was introduced.

2001
Texas elected the first male State President,
Justin Lemons, from Pampa, TX.

2003
The tag line, The Ultimate Leadership Experience
was voted on and was added to the logo.


 

2004
National dues increased from $7.00 to $8.00
Cost of gas: $1.92 per gallon.

2005
Leadership Enhancement Opportunities (LEO’s) (now Family
and Consumer Sciences Assesments) were introduced in Texas.

2007
National dues increased from $8.00 to $9.00
Cost of gas: $2.78 per gallon.

2008
Texas Proficiency Events were added to the
existing list of competitions.

2011
Texas FCCLA Visionary Committee was established to connect
local chapter advisors to the state staff and to give input on decisions.


 

2012

Texas FCCLA Business Advisory Council was established,
consisting of representatives from the career clusters identified
for family and consumer sciences.

2014
Texas hosted the National Leadership Conference in San Antonio, TX.


2015
Texas FCCLA began hosting Summer Summits- training
for local advisors and members.


 

2016
Texas Leadership Team was created offering leadership
development for officer candidates not elected.



...TEXAS FAMILY, CAREER AND COMMUNITY LEADERS OF AMERICA TODAY!



 

NOW
- Our organization is 75 years
  strong with over 24,600 members, 600   
  chapters and 895 advisors
- Texas FCCLA is giving $1.9 million a year in  
  member scholarships
- Texas FCCLA supports the Career Clusters: 
  Arts, A/V Technology & Communication, 
  Education & Training, Hospitality & Tourism, 
  and Human Services


 

Over 8,100 attended the 2019 regional conferences, with over 4,100 attending 
the state conference.



 

Throughout 75 years, members
continue to make a difference in their schools and communities while also preparing for their future families and careers.

In 2018, Texas members reached over 464,600 individuals with their school and community service projects. †


 



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