Skip to main content

Midland Living

Triggering Success

Jan 17, 2019 09:31AM
written  by  sabrina  forse  tatsch | photos  provided  by  luis  ramirez  & provided by willhite  family,  us  shooting,  cmp  (civilian  marksmanship  program)

     Repeating  the  mantra,  “Slow  and  small,”  Brooke  Willhite  visualizes  what  will  happen  just  seconds  after  she  pulls  the  trigger.  “You  want  your  hold  on  the  gun  to  be  as  slow  and  small  as  possible  while  you’re  focusing  on  a  perfect  sight  picture.  Before  a  match,  I  will  stretch,  listen  to  some  upbeat  music,  go  over  the  key  points  in  my  shot  process  and  then  let  my  body  take  over.  Slow  and  small  is  something  that  I  say  to  keep  my  mind  occupied  so  self-doubt  doesn’t  creep  in.  It  relaxes  me  and  reminds  me  that  I  know  exactly  what  I’m  doing,”  said  Brooke.  The  seventeen-year  old  Midland  Christian  School  senior  is  proving  herself  to  be  an  elite  athlete  in  the  world  of  competitive  shooting  sports.  She  is  sharing  that  world  with  her  eleven-year  old  brother,  Cash,  who  is  becoming  an  outstanding  marksman  in  his  own  right.      


 “I  love  that  it’s  an  individual  sport  meaning  that  if  you  succeed,  it’s  because  you  prepared  and  executed  well  or  if  you  struggle,  it’s  because  of  something  you  did.  There  is  no  one  else  to  blame.  It’s  about  self-discipline  and  you  have  to  challenge  yourself.”–  Brooke Willhite 

 

Cash  competes  in  multiple  events.  His  favorite  is  Precision  Air  Rifle  where  shooters  stand  and  focus  on  a  target  ten  meters  away.  “I  like  the  standing  one  best  because  I  can  focus  on  just  one  position,”  said  Cash.  He  also  competes  in  the  Three  Position  Air  Rifle  event  where  competitors  fire  twenty  shots  from  each  of  the  following  positions:  kneeling,  prone  (laying  down)  and  standing.  Then  he  uses  a  22-rifle  in  the  Three  Position  Smallbore, known  as  either  the  3X20  or  3X40.  The  competitor  shoots  either  twenty  or  forty  shots  from  each  position  at  fifty  meters  or  fifty  feet  depending  on  the  match.  Brooke  mainly  competes  in  the  Three  Position  Smallbore,  Three  Position  Air  Rifle,  Precision  Air  Rifle  and  National  Rifle  Association  (NRA)  Prone.  “My  favorite  is  the  Three  Position  Smallbore  because  I  feel  like  it’s  the  most  challenging.  It’s  really  a  test  in  endurance.  Matches  can  last  up  to  three  hours  and  you  have  to  focus  on  all  three  positions  instead  of  just  one,”  said  Brooke.    

Cash  sets  his  sights  on  his  mark  while  competing  in  the  Junior  Olympics


Both  Willhite  siblings  are  competing  at  the  national  level.  This  past  spring,  they  both  qualified  to  compete  at  the  National  Junior  Olympic  Shooting  Championship  at  the  Olympic  Training  Center  in  Colorado.  Cash  was  just  ten  years  old  and  the  youngest  athlete  in  the  competition,  but  that  didn’t  stop  him  from  earning  the  bronze  medal  for  Precision  Air  Rifle  J3.  J3  means  junior  shooters  who  are  14  years  old  or  younger.  “It  was  exciting  because  I  didn’t  feel  like  it  was  one  of  my  best  days.  It  showed  me  what  was  possible  and  what  you  can  achieve  with  hard  work.  Next,  I  would  like  to  qualify  for  both  the  air  rifle  and  the  smallbore  events,”  said  Cash.    

Brooke  thinks  about  her  next  shot  while  competing  in  the  Junior  Olympics

2018  was  the  first  year  that  Brooke  qualified,  and  she  already  has  her  sights  on  qualifying  again.  “My  scores  qualified  me  in  air  rifle  and  smallbore.  The  year  before,  I  was  just  two  points  below  in  both  disciplines,  so  I  was  excited  to  compete  at  the  Olympic  Training  Center.  It  was  amazing  to  see  how  people  at  that  level  prepare  and  handle  themselves.  You  may  not  speak  to  someone,  but  you  can  watch  them  and  learn  a  lot  that  way.  It  was  fun  to  compete  alongside  them  and  realize  they  are  just  normal  people  who  were  once  at  the  same  place  I  am.    It  makes  you  realize  what  you  can  achieve,”  said  Brooke.    

“Brooke  has  been  a  trailblazer  in  our  organization.  She  has  been  the  one  to  step  out  and  set  a  precedent  for  the  younger  kids  in  our  club.”  -  Kevin  Willhite 

In  2018,  Brooke  won  first  place  in  the  Sharp  Shooter  division  at  the  Texas  State  Rifle  Association  Smallbore  Prone  Championship.  At  the  NRA  National  Championship  in  Indiana,  Brooke  was  a  member  of  the  Texas  State  Rifle  Association  Junior  Team  that  was  crowned  the  Junior  National  Champions  in  Any  Sights  Conventional  3  Position  Smallbore,  won  a  team  silver  medal  in  Any  Sights,  and  a  team  bronze  medal  in  Iron  Sights  Open  Division.    

Years  before  she  competed  on  the  national  stage,  Brooke  was  just  a  young  girl  who  enjoyed  hunting  with  her  father.  “I  really  enjoyed  hunting  and  then  when  I  was  eleven,  we  learned  about  the  4-H  rifle  program.  I  had  already  been  showing  livestock  with  4-H  but  this  was  something  new.  My  dad  started  the  local  4-H  Rifle  &  Pistol  Club  and  started  coaching  us.    The  first  year,  it  was  just  me  and  four  boys  but  by  the  end  of  the  season,  I  was  the  only  one  who  wanted  to  continue,”  explained  Brooke.      

It’s  that  passion  that  helped  advance  youth  shooting  opportunities  in  the  area.  “Brooke  has  been  a  trailblazer  in  our  organization.  She  has  been  the  one  to  step  out  and  set  a  precedent  for  the  younger  kids  in  our  club,”  said  Kevin  Willhite,  Brooke  and  Cash’s  father.  “We  both  learned  together  and  tried  different  things.  I’ve  been  able  to  use  what  I  learned  coaching  her  to  coach  Cash  and  other  kids.”


In  addition  to  being  dad  and  coach,  Kevin  is  the  president  of  Permian  Basin  Young  Guns.  It’s  a  nonprofit  organization  dedicated  to  shooting  education  for  youth  and  women.  “We  saw  a  need  for  a  bigger  and  broader  program  for  youth  and  women  in  our  area  so  in  September  2016,  we  purchased  eighteen  acres  next  to  a  public  range  in  Midland,”  said  Kevin.  There,  the  Permian  Basin  Young  Guns  have  a  meeting  area,  an  indoor  BB  gun  and  air  rifle  range  and  an  outdoor  rifle  range  where  they  can  host  not  only  educational  courses  but  club  and  4-H  competitions.  “There  is  a  three-member  board  that  oversees  our  organization  and  we  rely  on  volunteers  to  help  coach  and  make  the  program  work.  The  number  one  thing  we  want  to  do  is  educate.  We  are  truly  educating  not  only  kids  but  families,  as  well.  We  want  to  teach  them  about  proper  marksmanship  and  gun  safety.  Our  focus  is  teaching  safety  that  kids  can  carry  into  adulthood,  whether  it’s  hunting  or  gun  safety.”  Permian  Basin  Young  Guns  teaches  multiple  classes,  including  hunter  education,  youth  bb-gun,  air  rifle  and  women’s  pistol.  “You  don’t  have  to  sign  up  long  term,”  said  Kevin.  “We  have  a  five-week  course  you  can  take.  You  can  stop  there  or  if  you  like  it,  take  another  class  and  maybe  you’ll  end  up  at  the  Junior  Olympics  too.”


Kevin  and  Cash  Willhite,  Permian  Basin  Young  Guns

For  those  wanting  to  reach  the  Junior  Olympics,  self-discipline  is  a  prerequisite.  “It’s  a  precision  sport  so  everything  has  to  be  right.  You  have  to  work  really  hard  to  try  and  get  good  at  it,”  said  Cash  who  typically  practices  two  to  three  hours  up  to  six  days  a  week  when  preparing  for  a  big  match.      

Brooke  typically  practices  three  mornings  per  week  before  school  and  four  to  five  days  per  week  after  school.  “When  there  is  a  big  match,  we’ll  ramp  it  up  even  more,”  said  Brooke.  “I  love  that  it’s  an  individual  sport  meaning  that  if  you  succeed,  it’s  because  you  prepared  and  executed  well  or  if  you  struggle,  it’s  because  of  something  you  did.  There  is  no  one  else  to  blame.  It’s  about  self-discipline  and  you  have  to  challenge  yourself.” While  it’s  an  individual  sport,  the  siblings  do  rely  on  each  other.    “It  really  does  go  both  ways.  We  identify  with  each  other.  If  something  isn’t  working  right,  I  can  ask  Cash  his  thoughts.  I’m  really  proud  of  the  work  he  puts  in  and  I  think  he’s  going  to  have  a  really  successful  career  if  he  sticks  with  it.”  

“The  number  one  thing  we  want  to  do  is  educate.  We  are  truly  educating  not  only  kids  but  families,  as  well.  Our  focus  is  teaching  safety  that  kids  can  carry  into  adulthood,  whether  it’s  hunting  or  gun  safety.”  -  Kevin  

The  Willhite’s  travel  the  county  to  compete  and  qualify  in  a  number  of  matches,  such  as  the  USA  Shooting  Rifle  National  Championship  in  Fort  Benning,  Georgia  where  both  siblings  earned  gold  medals.    Cash  placed  first  in  J3  50  meter  prone  and  Brooke  placed  first  in  C-Class  Women’s  50-meter  three  position,  3X40.  “The  rule  was  changed  recently  so  now  men  and  women  all  compete  in  the  3X40.  I  think  it’s  great  that  young  women  like  me  can  participate  in  a  sport  where  gender  doesn’t  limit  what  you  can  do,”  said  Brooke.    “I  also  like  that  you  don’t  have  to  be  a  certain  body  type.  There  are  women  like  Gold  Medal  Olympian  Ginny  Thrasher,  who  isn’t  much  taller  than  me,  and  I’m  just  five  foot.  Then  there’s  Mindy  Miles  who  is  another  world  class  competitor,  yet  a  completely  different  build.  It’s  been  really  inspiring  to  meet  such  phenomenal  shooters  and  compete  with  women  who  are  so  successful.”

Another  successful  woman  is  the  one  raising  these  two  young  athletes.    Brooke  and  Cash  call  her  mom,  but  Kevin  calls  his  wife  Janae  Willhite  an  unsung  hero.  “My  role  is  support  staff.  I  get  everyone  where  they  need  to  be  and  make  sure  they  have  everything  they  need,”  said  Janae.  “You  don’t  travel  light  when  you  have  rifles,  equipment  and  luggage.”  Janae  has  managed  to  make  traveling  across  the  country  from  match  to  match  a  fun  experience.  “She  turns  it  into  a  family  vacation  and  we  make  stops  along  the  way,”  said  Cash.  “Nothing  bonds  a  family  like  seeing  the  world’s  largest  covered  wagon,”  joked  Brooke,  in  reference  to  a  stop  the  family  made  in  Illinois  while  en  route  to  the  NRA  Championship.

Cash  Willhite  wins  the  bronze at  the  Junior  Olympics Cash  was  just  ten  years  old  and  the  youngest  athlete  in  the  competition,  but  that  didn’t  stop  him  from  earning  the  bronze  medal  for  Precision  Air  Rifle  J3.

Brooke  and  Cash  are  building  upon  milestones  they  once  didn’t  even  think  possible.  “At  one  point  it  was  just  a  dream  of  ours  to  even  compete  in  a  national  match.  Now  that  they  are  doing  it  and  winning  some  hardware,  it’s  really  exciting,”  said  Kevin.  “The  most  important  thing  is  preparation.  I  want  them  to  develop  the  skills  and  confidence  to  walk  into  a  national  level  match  and  feel  prepared.  They  need  to  be  able  to  go  through  the  process  on  their  own  with  very  little  input  from  me.  I  want  to  develop  all  our  athletes  with  Permian  Basin  Young  Guns  to  be  independent.  I  always  tell  them  to  act  like  a  champion  and  you’ll  become  a  champion.” These  young  champions  are  setting  goals  on  and  off  the  range.  Cash  aspires  to  qualify  for  international  competition.  Brooke  plans  to  pursue  her  shooting  sports  options  in  college,  but  academically  she  plans  to  earn  degrees  in  both  mechanical  and  biomedical  engineering.  “Both  Cash  and  Brooke  are  disciplined  and  have  a  good  work  ethic,”  said  Kevin.  “I  hope  that  whatever  they  pursue  in  life,  they  will  continue  to  be  good  ambassadors  for  youth  shooting  sports  and  as  adults  become  involved  in  teaching  and  give  back  to  their  community.” †


For more information about Permian Basin Young Guns, visit:  
Upcoming Events Near You

No Events in the next 45 days.

Digital Issue Winter 2019
  
Newsletter